#TechTuesday: Why gaming has returned to its roots

gaming
Nintendo is bringing its SNES back to shelves worldwide. Image sourced from Wikimedia Commons.

For each step forward, gaming remains with a foot in the past.

It’s not a criticism and it’s certainly not a bad thing.

But we should ask ourselves why things are the way they are.

Let’s recap on what’s happened within the gaming sphere in the year or so.

Games and games series are constantly being remastered and adapted to modern consoles and platforms.

We’ve had Crash Bandicoot return to old-school with the N Sane Trilogy.

It’s been confirmed the iconic horror game Resident Evil 2 will be remade.

And now Nintendo has released a limited run of the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) Classic Edition.

Like its predecessor, the console will feature 21 retro games in a built-in games library.

Can we then look to the past to determine the future of gaming?

If you answered yes or no, you’re probably right.

The biggest draw of a remastered or re-released game is the nostalgia factor.

You played Crash when you were five, so playing the remastered version is a return to childhood happiness.

Or maybe Resident Evil was the first game to give you nightmares.

The point is these games remain relevant because of that emotional investment.

That’s why they sell – a post-2000s child won’t care if it’s a PS4 or an old-school NES, they just want to play.

So is this the start of a trend, where older games will return to the mainstream?

Again, you could answer yes and no.

Compare nostalgic re-releases to series such as Grand Theft Auto.

GTA started out as a top-down shooter and has evolved into a fully 3D first/third person shooter.

Would a remaster of the original game really work in Rockstar Games’ best interest?

We’ll leave that up to the reader to debate.

 

If you enjoyed the article, here are some related pieces:

Google discards its Instant Search feature

Video game sports you can recreate at home

Remember to visit our FacebookTwitter and Instagram pages.

Add us on WhatsApp today! 082 874 5550

and BBM pin D1EF333B.

You can also email our offices on Reveshni Douglas at [email protected] Quinton Boucher at [email protected] Bruce Douglas at [email protected] Tersia Gopi at [email protected] Zianne Leibrandt at [email protected]

  AUTHOR
Bruce Douglas
Journalist

Latest News

COMMENTS

Top
Next Story x
LETTER: What’s the problem with hunting?